There was the Young Man, Drowning in the Sink…

There was the young man, drowning in the sink. Everyone says that it was because of gravity that he was drowning. Unfortunately, they were right. His older brother looked on as he helplessly stood just a few feet away. The gravity of sin pulled the young man deeper and deeper into the waters until his fight for breath was as meaningless as a caged bird.

With civility, Sin initially used his charm to lead the young man to the sink. The older brother did not scruple to attempt to take his brother away from Sin’s grip. However, little did the older brother know, Sin had a grip on him as well. Soon enough the older brother grew passive and was frozen in place. So much so..….that he was powerless to help. Complications were more layered than tiramisu. All hope was lost for the brothers. Sin rejoiced as he was winning the war.

Things were not always this way. There was once a time when things were pure and life seemed innocuous. Is this not the human experience: that in one moment everything can be so beautiful and right, and then in one fellow swoop (a phone call, an accident, one conversation) there becomes all this weight laid on your soul. All of a sudden your soul cannot breathe because the gravity of sin is too much to bear. Sometimes the change is quick. Sometimes the change is slow-moving, With the great wisdom of Sin, most of the time the latter method is the case. One minute you’re on a raft close to shore and the next minute, without realizing, the waves have drifted you out into the sea. Whether it’s sin, loss, betrayal, hate, or whether it’s being overwhelmed; you then cry out for God’s nearness and help, but the only voice you hear is darkness. Or maybe the devil himself. Or sometimes worse…. you hear nothing at all. Maybe, nothing at all. Such scary times there.

 

The young man hadn’t noticed his far drift until it was too late. He was not lying in a sink – to the contrary, he was drowning in the ocean waters. His death was imminent. On the other side, the older brother’s passiveness caused his ability to save his brother to be nonexistent. The young man finally gives up. His lungs begin to fill with water. His heartbeat slows down. His skin coloring grows dark. His heart beats its last beat. His older brother, still looking on, drops to his knees in gloomy defeat.

 

Suddenly, with all hope lost and with Sin and death close to victorious reign, Love interrupts. The loving Narrator of the story interjects Himself. The omnipotent Narrator who knew the characters before writing the story, who created the story, and who knows how it ends as He types away … suddenly appears. For He is the only one who can save the brothers. He is the perfect one that loves both idiotic brothers and can shift them back onto the path he designed them to walk long before the story began. For what the brothers were powerless to do because they were weakened by their flesh, the Narrator freely did – Even as the brothers did not deserve to be saved. The narrator turns a hopeless story into a story of good news! Odd thing is, the Narrator could have corrected things a long time ago but chose to wait. Why? That is something for us to wrestle with until we meet Him face to face. We do know that He does as he pleases with the powers of heaven and the peoples of the earth. No one can hold back his hand or say to him: “What have you done?”

The book of Hebrews says that Jesus endured all that loss and betrayal. It describes that he also suffered a brutal death. It claims that He endured those things so that He can empathize with us and say, “I know how these hard times feel”. Luckily Jesus the Empathizer is also Jesus the Narrator who is in control of the entire story. There is a warm blanket to our soul in knowing that our Narrator intimately knows us, loves us, and has the ultimate power to save us.


What an almighty and glorious narrator that would be.

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